Moose River, LLC

Our commitment toward the protection and preservation of your land’s natural resources.

Noxious weed invasion is one of the most serious problems in the United States today threatening public and private lands, destroying rangelands suitable for livestock, and most importantly, deteriorating wildlife habitat and the rich diversity of grass and plant species that animals depend upon for survival. Because noxious weeds are undesirable plants that have been imported from infected areas, they have no natural biological controls. As a result, they overrun and displace native plant species depriving them of soil and soil nutrients. The result has a negative impact on the overall health of our natural resources.
States across the U.S. have been establishing their own county weed boards to carry out the responsibility of limiting economic loss and adverse environmental effects due to the presence and spread of noxious weeds. These specially appointed boards have developed noxious weed and invasive species lists that are publicly available, have implemented strict laws for public and private lands, and have utilized a plan based on the identification, control, and public education of noxious weeds.
 
What can you do to help fight the war against noxious weed invasion? Everyone can do their part in weed prevention and detection by remembering these few important rules.
  • Recreate only on established roads and trails and in campsites away from currently infested areas. Failing to do so could possibly spread weed seeds via clothing, camping equipment, tools, or other materials.
  • Educate yourself to avoid unknowingly picking unidentified wild flowers and discarding them along trails or roadways that are in weed-free condition.
  • Check boats, jet skis, water towables, floating devices, and water craft haul trailers for evidence of water plants adhering to surfaces. Before leaving the boat launch facilities, remove any visible mud and plant material from your equipment including the anchor, the props, and anything that entered the water. Dispose of collected items in proper trash receptacles commonly found at public boat access sites.
  • Boaters and anglers are strongly urged to clean and dry waders, bait buckets, fishing lures, tackle, nets, and other fishing and boating gear upon arriving home.
  • Inspect and clean motorized off-road trail vehicles, all-terrain vehicles, mountain bikes, and other non-motorized vehicles of weeds and seeds before leaving the site or trail-head. It is imperative that special attention is given to the wheels of such vehicles.
  • When using pack animals in non-infested areas, thoroughly clean coats and hooves and carry only feed that is certified “weed free”.
  • Learn about plants and be able to identify noxious weeds that are invasive to your area. Do not buy noxious weed seeds from seed companies or noxious weeds being sold as ornamentals from floral shops. Also, be very selective when choosing your nursery stock to be used in home landscaping. Nurseries and garden shops continue to sell plants that are listed on state and local noxious weed lists.
  • If by chance you are unable to avoid an infested area, carefully remove all weed seeds and other plant material from clothing (paying close attention to Velcro® fastenings), shoes, camping and hiking gear, and even pets before entering a weed-free area. Furthermore, if you recognize noxious weeds, pull the weeds up by the roots, leaving non-seed-producing plants or plant parts where you found them to dry out. When possible, if you come across seed producing parts, place them in a plastic bag, and either pack them out or dispose of them in the appropriate trash receptacle. Mentally take note and report the description and location of the infestation to the proper agency.
  • Commit to a proactive approach to weed management by organizing or becoming involved in county, state, and federal weed-control projects or just simply spreading the word about the negative ecological impacts of noxious weeds and what people can do to help.
How you can identify and help control invasive plants and noxious weeds? Please visit the following websites to learn more.

Montana State Invasive and Noxious Weeds
 

The following terrestrial noxious weeds are not only widespread and aggressive, but are abundant in many counties throughout the state of Montana as well.

Canada Thistle
Canada Thistle
Common Tansy
Common Tansy
Dalmatian Toadflax
Dalmatian Toadflax
Diffuse Knapweed
Diffuse Knapweed
Field Bindweed
Field Bindweed
Hoary Alyssum
Hoary Alyssum
Houndstongue
Houndstongue
Leafy Spurge
Leafy Spurge
Oxeye Daisy
Oxeye Daisy
Russian Knapweed
Russian Knapweed
Saltcedar
Saltcedar
Spotted Knapweed
Spotted Knapweed
Sulfur Cinquefoil
Sulfur Cinquefoil
Whitetop
Whitetop
Yellow Toadflax
Yellow Toadflax
 

The following terrestrial noxious weeds have a limited existence in Montana and may be found in small, scattered, localized infestations. However, these weeds either have the potential to spread or are currently spreading from their existing infestation sites at an alarming rate.

Blueweed
Blueweed
Dyers Woad
Dyers Woad
Japanese Knotweed
Japanese Knotweed
Meadow Hawkweed Complex
Meadow Hawkweed Complex
Orange Hawkweed
Orange Hawkweed
Perennial Pepperweed
Perennial Pepperweed
Purple Loosestrife
Purple Loosestrife
Rush Skeletonweed
Rush Skeletonweed
Scotch Broom
Scotch Broom
St. Johnswort
St. Johnswort
Tall Buttercup
Tall Buttercup
Tansy Ragwort
Tansy Ragwort
Yellow Starthistle
Yellow Starthistle
Yellowflag Iris
Yellowflag Iris
Curly-Leaf Pondweed
Curly-Leaf Pondweed
~Aquatic Species~
Eurasian Watermilfoil
Eurasian Watermilfoil
~Aquatic Species~
Flowering Rush
Flowering Rush
~Aquatic Species~
 

Regulated plants are not a Montana listed noxious weed but have the potential to have significant adverse effects on the environment. Fortunately, some invasive species recognized as a "regulated plant" have not been detected within the state of Montana but are currently present in several neighboring states. A few examples are:

Cheatgrass
Cheatgrass
Hydrilla
Hydrilla
Russian Olive Tree
Russian Olive Tree
 
For more weed photos, detailed descriptions, and treatment options please visit Montana Weed Control Association.